Podcasts

Listening to podcasts is a great way to learn and entertain yourself while driving, cooking, hanging up the washing or anything else. Get your ears and minds ready for these awesome podcasts, with topics ranging from history to tikanga to indigenous wāhine. 

From the author behind the bestselling Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race, comes a podcast that takes the conversation a step further.

An interview series with change-makers & culture-shapers exploring what it means to be a good ancestor, hosted by globally respected speaker, anti-racism educator and author, Layla F. Saad.

A series of articles, podcasts and documentaries that travels Aotearoa meeting young Kiwis as they discuss the impacts of colonisation today, modern race relations and how they are decolonising themselves.

A podcast and video series from RNZ, telling the story of New Zealand and its people from its geological origins to modern day.

With a mixture of Māori and English, the Taringa podcast is the perfect way to learn te reo and tikanga Māori in a fun and relaxed way. Episodes are posted weekly, discussing either kupu, iwi, stories or tikanga.

A five part series about building a better school system, and what gets in the way, looking at the 60-year relationship between white parents and the public school down the block.

A collection of short stories about encounters between between Māori and European prior to the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi.

When digested collectively, a larger story unfolds.

This non-profit social enterprise amplifies 100 Indigenous female change-makers and leaders through audio podcasts, photography, videography, books, art and live events.

A ten part video and podcast series and civics class for all New Zealanders covering history, law, politics, economics and international relations. The first 3 episode look at Tangata Whenua, settlers and the Settler Government. 

small_GETTINGBETTER_MainImagewithlogoand

Māori Medical Student trainee doctor and award-winning writer Emma Espiner (Ngāti Tukorehe, Ngāti Porou) travels to the front lines of healthcare in New Zealand, where the statistics clearly show Māori are suffering.